Monday, May 8, 2017

The 8th Annual Hunt History of Maryland Medicine Lecture

Please join MedChi and the Center for a Healthy Maryland
for the
8th Annual Thomas E. Hunt, Jr. MD
History of Maryland Medicine Lecture
THE IMPORTANCE OF ARCHIVES:
CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF ARCHIVES AT JOHNS HOPKINS

Speaker:
Nancy McCall, Archivist
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

Thursday, June 29th, 2017
MedChi's Osler Hall
Reception: 5:45 p.m.
Lecture: 6:15 p.m.

Free & Paid Parking is available in the immediate vicinity

Please RSVP by June 25 to 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

MedChi's Pre-1900 Medical Journals Are Now Digitized

MedChi, The Maryland State Medical Society, is pleased to announce that 65 volumes of the Maryland Medical Journal, from 1878 to 1899, have been digitized and are now available to the public in a fully searchable version. Twentieth century medical journals from all 50 states are being digitized as part of a national project, but MedChi’s medical journal was founded in 1878, and the decision was made to privately fund the digitization of the nineteenth century volumes. Please click HERE to see the digital versions. 


In the 1800’s, the Maryland Medical Journal was published Medical & Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, now known as MedChi, The Maryland State Medical Society. Each weekly issue was 50 to 70 pages long and featured articles on medical advances, papers on specific diseases and cures, obituaries of physicians from around the world, and news, notes and anecdotes.
The digital versions of these early medical journals will be invaluable to scholars, medical historians and genealogists, as the volumes are fully searchable by name, topic and other criteria and are available through Archives.org.

Digitization was done through Archives.org, a non-profit digital library offering free universal access to books, movies, music, and 284 billion archived web pages, at its location in Beltsville, Maryland. Funding for the project was provided by Dr. Mario Molina, a member of MedChi.

This project has taken a while, but literally, now our journals will be available forever!

Monday, March 6, 2017

#TBT

Are you friends with MedChi, The Maryland State Medical Society on FaceBook? If you aren't, you should be, and if you are, you might have seen our #TBT (Throw-Back Thursday) photographs.

Each Thursday, we post a picture and an explanation of it. We are hoping to share with our followers some of the items that are in our archives. Here are some of the recent entries!

MedChi's HQ building two months into its construction in 1909. You can see our other building just to the right.

Detail of the old school building.

An early HQ building on Calvert Street.

Harvey Cushing's bookplate.

Hopkins in the early years.

I hope that you will follow MedChi on Facebook, if only to see what we're "throwing back."

Monday, February 20, 2017

Library Hand

Have you ever heard of "Library Hand", the uniform style of handwriting used in card catalogues?
I just learned of it this weekend in the amazing Atlas Obscura, a website of all things wild and wonderful. 

It was created in the 1880's before typewriters became a common office machine. Handwriting at that time was full of flourishes and swoops, and totally unsuitable for a library's card catalogue. 

After much discussion, a hand which featured “a slight back-hand, with regular round letters apart from each other, and not shaded” was selected as the standard for cards. The emphasis was on legibility and not haste, so hand-writing out the cards took an incredible amount of time. 

In MedChi's card catalogue, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of hand-written cards, including many in Marcia Noyes' handwriting which looks very similar to library hand! 
It's always fun to find something new. Here's the link to the original Atlas Obscura article.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Happy Valentine's Day!

Please accept all of our very best wishes for a wonderful Valentine's Day!
We love that you read our blog!

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Hayden: The Man & The Mineral

While most people know Horace H. Hayden 

as the founder of the first dental school in America, he's got another claim to fame!

Dr. Hayden was one of the founders of the Maryland Academy of Sciences and served as its president in 1825. In 1820, as a pioneer geologist and botanist, he published the first general work on geology to be printed in the United States. 

He discovered the mineral called Haydenite, obviously named after him. It's only been found in one place: the Jones Falls Valley which bisects Baltimore City. There have always been quarries along the Jones Falls, including one at Bare Hills. The specific quarry where Haydenite was found is at the intersection of the Jones Falls and Stoney Run, somewhere around North Avenue and Maryland Avenue.

Haydenite is an orange to golden brown chabazite with scalenohedral modifications and showing contact twinning. The chemical make up of Haydenite is (Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O

The portrait of Dr. Hayden at the top of the page is by Rembrandt Peale, a famed Baltimore painter. 

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Thomas Cromwell Corner, Portrait Artist

Have you ever heard of Thomas Cromwell Corner? You might not know who he is, but if you've ever visited MedChi, you've surely seen his work. 
Sir William Osler, MD

Cromwell was born in Baltimore in 1865 and attended Baltimore City College. He attended the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and the Art Students League in New York. He also studied in Paris at Acadêmie Jullian. 
George Warner Miltenberger, MD *

When he returned to Baltimore in 1892, he became one of the city's leading portraitists, beginning with the city's leading businessmen and then moving on to the top physicians. 
Henry Mills Hurd, MD

Corner was on the committee to help establish an art museum, and when the Baltimore Museum of Art opened in 1915, he became one of its Trustees, bridging the gap between the museum and the art community.
William Travis Howard, MD

MedChi is fortunate to own five of Corner's paintings, all shown here. 
Clement Clark, MD

There is a book, of which only 190 copies were privately printed, which is the catalogue raisonné of the works of Thomas Cromwell Corner. MedChi was fortunate to recently acquire a copy for our library. 

* I must confess that the portrait of Dr. Miltenberger is my favorite of all of the portraits.